Model Rocketry and Siege Engine Glossary Letter E


Model Rocketry and Siege Engine Glossary Letter E

Glossary
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Egg Lofter
A rocket designed to carry one or more eggs as payload. Used in competition in which the object is to boost the egg to the maximum possible altitude and recover it without breaking
Ejection Baffle
A physical or mechanical barrier ahead of a motor mount designed to absorb the heat and hot particles of the ejection charge while allowing the gas to pressurize the airframe
Ejection Charge
A small charge of pyrotechnic matter, usually BP, triggered either by the delay train, timer or an altimeter, used to deploy the recovery device
Electric Match
A type of electrical igniter (see igniter)
Elevation
An angle on a vertical plane. See Azimuth
Elevator
A moveable surface on the horizontal stabilizer of an aircraft. The surface is responsible for pitch control
Elliptical Dihedral
A curved wing, in which the tip of a glider’s wing curves up at a higher angle than the rest of the wing. The angle is the form of an arc rather than a sharp turn. See Dihedral
Engine
A device that uses energy to produce mechanical motion. In rocketry, the term is often used interchangeably with Motor, though Motor is the more accurate term. See Motor
Epoxy®
A two-part adhesive used extensively in applications requiring high strength.
Chemically, a compound in which an oxygen atom is joined to two carbon atoms in a chain to form a bridge. Specifically, a resin containing epoxy groups, that polymerizes spontaneously when mixed with a phenol (see phenolic), forming a strong, hard, resistant adhesive
Epoxy is probably the most commonly used adhesive in high power rocket construction. It comes in several formulations, mostly having to do with the time it takes to cure. Epoxy’s only disadvantages as a rocketry adhesive are its relatively high weight and its low (approximately 200°F) melting point.
Erosion, nozzle
The wearing or burning away of the throat of the motor nozzle caused by the hot gases ejecting from the motor. Also called Ablation
Escape Velocity
A property of a spatial body expressed in terms of the speed in an outward direction that a molecule, rocket, or other body must move in order for it to escape the gravitational attraction of the spatial body
Exhaust Clearance
On some models, the amount of offset required to prevent damage to parts below the motor nozzle from the motor exhaust
Exhaust Velocity
The velocity of the gases ejected through the nozzle of a rocket engine or motor relative to the nozzle. Exhaust velocity is an important consideration in motor design because, according to Newton’s third law of Motion, the thrust of the motor is at least partially dependent on the velocity of the motor’s exhaust
Exit Area
The cross-sectional area of the rocket engine nozzle where the exhaust gases are released into the atmosphere
Exothermic
A type of chemical reaction in which energy is produced as the reaction proceeds. The burning of propellant or delay elements are examples of exothermic reactions
Explosives Act
Canadian law defining and governing the use of all explosive substances outside the Canadian Armed Forces


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