Model Rocketry and Siege Engine Glossary Letter N


Model Rocketry and Siege Engine Glossary Letter N

Glossary
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NAR
National Association of Rocketry
NARAM
National Association of Rocketry Annual Meet - The annual week-long launch hosted by the NAR
NARCON
The annual NAR convention
Neutral Stability
The condition in which a rocket’s CP and CG are at the same spot. Dynamically, this creates a situation in which a rocket may fly steadily in dead air but can’t recover if the angle of attack is greater than zero
Newton
The amount of force required to accelerate one kg, one meter per second per second. 4.45 newtons equals one pound of force
Newton-Second
The typical unit of measurement for rocket thrust. One newton-second is one newton of thrust maintained for one second
NFPA
National Fire Protection Association - Private corporation for setting safety standards
NFPA 1122
Standards code for U.S. Model Rocketry
NFPA 1127
Standards code for U.S. High Power Rocketry
Nichrome
Refers to the metal content (nickel/chromium) of the igniter wire most commonly used in model rockets. Nickel/chromium is chosen as a material because it has high resistance and high strength. When exposed to an electrical current, it will glow yellow-hot before burning through
Nike Airfoil
See Diamond Airfoil
Nitrous Oxide
(N2O)Gaseous oxidizer used in current hybrid rocket motors
Nomex®
A lightweight, fire-resistant Nylon fiber, originally woven into fireproof garments for fire fighters, race car drivers and astronauts. Also commonly used in aircraft upholstery. In hobby rocketry, Nomex is used as sheaths and bags to protect elastic shock cords and parachutes. See Deployment Bag.
NOMEX® is a registered trademark of E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company. It is a flame retardant meta-aramid material
Nose Blow Recovery
Recovery method for light models by simply ejecting the nose cone and having it come down attached on the shock cord
Nose Cone
A cone-shaped shield that fits over, or is, the nose of a rocket vehicle or rocket motor. Cones are not always strictly cone-shaped. They are sometimes rounded but are most commonly ogive (a pointed arch). Nose cones are an important consideration in rocket design, since they provide two ways to move the center of gravity forward if needed; by using a longer cone, or by adding weight to the cone
Nose Heavy
The condition in which a glider is trimmed into a dive or a rocket has excessive mass in the nose
Nose Weight
A weight, often of lead, epoxy or modeling clay, which is added to the nose of a rocket to move its center of gravity forward and improve the rocket’s stability.
Nozzle
A duct of changing cross section in which the fluid velocity is increased. Nozzles are usually converging-diverging, but may be uniformly diverging or converging
NSL
National Sport Launch: an annual three-day launch hosted by the NAR


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